PC gamer uses TV on the wall instead of monitor on the desk and is thrilled, but two details excite the community even more

The Fluid Simulation from Lively Wallpaper reacts to mouse movements. (Image: LG, stock.adobe.com - Cookie Studio)


The “Fluid Simulation” from Lively Wallpaper reacts to mouse movements. (Image: LG, stock.adobe.com – Cookie Studio)

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PC monitors in 16:9 format are usually a maximum of 32 inches in size. From over 2,200 models listed in the price comparison portal Miser This applies to around 98 percent of these screens.

If you like it bigger, you'll be happy to take a look around the TV area, as did the Reddit user ENFP-A has done.

In a current one Forum post from him he shows his new television in a short demonstration video. It is an LG C2 with an OLED panel, previously he used a PC monitor with a VA panel.

The Reddit user is excited about his new screen:

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I've never fallen in love with the look of the VA panel as much as I did with this TV

While there is often confirmation of this in the comments, the top two answers are about something completely different: the software shown in the demonstration video and the sensitivity of the mouse. But what is so remarkable about it?

Detail #1: A nice animation

The animation from the player's video is available not only for the Lively Wallpaper tool, but also for the Wallpaper Engine on Steam.
The animation from the player's video is available not only for the Lively Wallpaper tool, but also for the Wallpaper Engine on Steam.






The animation from the player's video is available not only for the Lively Wallpaper tool, but also for the Wallpaper Engine on Steam.

The program from the video is discussed in many comments. You can see the lighting effect from the screenshot above, in which a kind of fireball moves across the otherwise black screen and changes its color and shape.

Even without your own OLED monitor, you can clearly see in the video that the animation is tailor-made for such a screen with self-illuminating pixels and deep black levels. One comment reads: I thought the screen was off – that's impressive!

What software is it? It's about the tool Lively wallpapers, as ENFP-A confirms in a comment. This is an alternative to the very popular Steam top dog Wallpaper Engine, which you can find out more about in the following article:

More precisely, it is called the dynamic background Fluid Simulation. In the Wallpaper Engine it is called Fluid animation.

Detail #2: Tiny mouse movements

Another notable thing about the video is the barely noticeable mouse movements. The comment with the second most upvotes is appropriate Holy DPI motherand underneath it says, among other things: I didn't realize the movement [der Animation] controlled by mouse.

The abbreviation DPI stands for Dots per inchso points per inch. The higher the DPI, the greater the sensitivity of the mouse.

Since the player's television uses 4K resolution, the DPI must be very high in order to cover such long distances on the monitor with such little movement.

TV vs monitor: The most important differences

The question still remains, is it even a good idea to use a TV instead of a PC screen? In many cases this is possible without any problems, but there are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Latency: Televisions often use settings that are intended to improve the picture for films and television, but which also result in a certain delay in input. A suitable game mode now often provides a solution.
  • Pixel density: Due to the larger screen diagonal, the pixel density on televisions is smaller than on PC screens with the same resolution. This can make the image appear coarser. How much this is the case also depends on the exact seat distance and size.
  • Reflections: TV screens tend to have a reflective surface, which can be annoying, especially in bright environments.
  • Connections: While DisplayPort is widespread and frequently used in PC monitors, TV sets usually rely exclusively on HDMI. However, modern graphics cards support HDMI 2.1, which means high refresh rates of 144 Hertz are possible even in 4K.
  • Space requirement: Televisions usually need more space than PC screens and suitable brackets must be able to carry a higher weight. A larger seating distance is also recommended than with PC monitors.

Last but not least, when using an OLED panel as in this case, it may be advisable to only show static PC elements such as the Windows taskbar when necessary. This counteracts the possible problem of image content being burned in.

PC monitors with OLED panels are just as affected by this potential problem as televisions. At the same time, the manufacturers of current models now have this aspect better and better under control, which you can read about here:

How relevant is probably the biggest concern with OLED monitors? This is what experts say about burn-in problems

How do you feel about using a TV instead of a PC screen? Are you already part of the group of Windows gamers who rely on a TV as a monitor? Or do you reject this solution – and if so, why? Did you already know tools like Lively Wallpaper? Feel free to write it in the comments and tell us which screen you are currently playing on and what your background looks like!

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