New details on the Audio Work in Halo Infinite

halo infinite audio work details

With hints about the mechanics of changing the commentator in multiplayer.

On April 16, 343 Industries, the developers of the upcoming Halo Infinite, released another episode of the Ask343 podcast as part of the Inside Infinite program, where the main questions of the players were answered by the staff in the field of audio design.

First of all, the developers decided to tell more information about dynamic music and its work in multiplayer mode – it will work only at certain moments of the match: the beginning, the end and the key moment of the match.

In response to fan questions collected via the game’s official Twitter account, they shared the following new, more technical details about the sound of Halo Infinite:

  • The new system “room – portal” allows you to hear the most natural sound from behind the wall of the next room, even when there are no portals at all.
  • Halo Infinite’s soundtrack won’t be monotonous. The music always changes throughout the character development arc, acting out their basic emotions and motives, such as a sudden betrayal.
  • The priority of the sound volume depends on what kind of danger to the player is accompanied by this sound, respectively, the sounds of shooting your allies or teammates will be the most muffled in comparison with other sounds, but still quite distinguishable.
  • The volume of the threat sounds depends on the following parameters: who the threat is directed at, where the enemy is aiming, how far away he is, and what kind of weapon or vehicle it is. But the key parameter, in the end, was the type of the enemy himself.
  • The soundtrack is hi-tech and “very adaptable” to whatever you do in the game, be it travel or battle. The background music always changes because of what, when, where, with whom and at what point in the plot you are fighting.
  • There are three types of footsteps in Halo Infinite: yours, your teammates, and enemies. The steps are included in the overall 3D sound model. For example, the steps of the flag carrier will be clearer and will be heard from the side where the player who captured it is located, which will help you better navigate the game.
  • Music from the 2020 gameplay demo is part of the game’s working soundtrack, just like the E3 2019 trailer. The track from the 2018 trailer was just a pen test and is unlikely to appear in the game.
  • Damage and wear and tear of vehicles are also played up with the sound, including the sounds of interaction with the environment. For example, the sound of driving on the ground with a damaged wheel will be very different from driving on whole wheels. That is, players will always be able to determine the technical condition of the vehicle by sound.
  • Developers, in general, would like streamers and other content creators to be able to use the music from Halo Infinite, but so far they can’t promise that all the music in the game will be without copy protection.
  • The sound of the Chief’s basic combat rifle is based on a combination of sounds from the FN SCAR assault rifle and the M240P machine gun. But the final version was made with the expectation that the final sound of the rifle was reminiscent of the sound from Halo 2.
  • The studio will no longer be able to share new songs before the release of the game, as their names can spoil the plot.

They also wrote some emotional Heavy Price Paid tracks from the original Halo 2 – the team is confident that they will be able to complement key plot scenes.

The sounds of a shot, reloading and behavior of many weapons that were in the series from the very beginning were decided to rework – for example, during charging, the plasma pistol will begin to “howl” slowly turning into a buzzing state with crackling sounds.

A large number of different sounds have been recorded for wildlife and its surroundings, and the sound of the technique will change depending on the degree of damage.

The sound of the player, allies, and foes will be slightly different to aid in awareness. Basically, the implementation of sound will remain at the level of last year’s demo, at the moment the developers are only busy polishing it and improving positioning.

The composition from the E3 2018 announcement trailer will not be featured in the final game.

Jeff Steidzer, multiplayer commentator for the series, will return to his role and his voice acting will be the only one on release – despite the fact that the developers hint at the possibility of customization of the commentary in the future.

Halo Infinite is due out this fall on PC, Xbox One and Xbox Series X / S – free for Xbox Game Pass subscribers.